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Art and the River Public Art Trail

Art and the River Public Art Trail

Distance: 6.09 km ( 3.78 miles )  Duration: 2 hours   Last Updated: 10 Dec 2019
An excellent walk added by Jason Mellows it's near Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia.
The walk begins at the Maritime Museum, South Bank and ends at the Thornton Street ferry terminal, after taking a detour to the top of the cliffs at Kangaroo Point Park. The trail, through its artwork and heritage, tells the story of the river’s maritime and industrial history. It includes sculptures that evoke memories of World Expo ’88 and artworks that celebrate the beauty and grandeur of the surrounding Kangaroo Point cliffs and the river.
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Trail Highlights

Man and Matter

Man and Matter

Peter D Cole’s Man and Matter sculptural series was one of the works commissioned by Expo ’88. Relocated to Kangaroo Point Boardwalk in 1992 as part of the parklands upgrade, this is the series of sculptures that can be seen throughout the first section of the Art and the River trail.To fully appreciate Cole’s artwork, it helps to understand the scale of Expo ’88 and how much the people of Brisbane enjoyed the party.




Biomechanical Pelicans

Biomechanical Pelicans

Christopher Trotter’s two stylised pelicans that sit upon a river pylon, near the Captain Cook Bridge. The Biomechanical Pelicans were Trotter’s second public commission and early evidence of Trotter’s interest in environmental themes and the concept of renewal through recycling. Since this early work, Trotter has continued to refine his concept of sustainability and the use of recycled materials is an intrinsic part of his work. Trotter explains, “the pelicans reference the time when our waterways were healthy. The element of recycling in my work is important to me and helps promote the concept of creative solutions to future generations”


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.35 km ( 0.22 miles )

Solar Sunflower

Solar Sunflower

Set against the backdrop of the Kangaroo Point Cliffs, this large sunflower draws energy from its solar powered panels. In turn, the panels activate the three metre flower head which spins on top of its stem. The speed with which the flower head rotates depends on how much of the sun it receives. The artwork lives and interacts with the environment in the sense that it converts energy from the sun and creates movement. Created by Jonathon Coleman in 1995


Distance from previous hotspot: 1.09 km ( 0.68 miles )

Reflections at Midday

Reflections at Midday

A sundial embellished with astrological symbols and text wrapping around its circumference. Jandy Pannel Outer circle cast in bronze, stars in glass, set in concrete base, 1995


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.00 km ( 0.00 miles )

Fish Fossil

Fish Fossil

Drawing inspiration from the surrounding cliffs and the Brisbane River, Christopher Trotter explains how Fish Fossil evolved from an interest in what lay beneath the cliffs and the element of discovery. “This was my first fossil style of work…I created an organic steel skeletal form made from discarded components and laid them in a panel of wet concrete. I jack hammered them out again like an archaeologist revealing a true fossil”


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.03 km ( 0.02 miles )

Geerbaugh’s Midden

Geerbaugh’s Midden

Ron Hurley’s Geerbaugh’s Midden has been described as a “celebration of the cliffs by the Rainbow Serpent and inspired by conversations with an old man by the name of Geerbaugh. Geerbaugh was the last traditional member of the Waka Waka nation”. The description goes on to explain the symbolism in the artwork: “Each of the six poles represents a star in the Southern Cross and each of the six clans mentioned above is a reminder of a history that is denied and seldom spoken about”.


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.11 km ( 0.07 miles )

Flickering Wind Generator

Flickering Wind Generator

Flickering Wind Generator is another installation about sustainability by Johnathon Coleman. Installed at the top of a shelter, the rotor blades of this piece turn in the wind and convert wind energy into electrical energy through a series of electromagnetic charges


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.14 km ( 0.09 miles )

Crossover Guardians

Crossover Guardians

Mona Ryder has welded, fabricated and bolted together various thicknesses of galvanised steel to form the sculpture Crossover Guardians. Ryder’s intention was to create sculptures that act as guardians or beacons over the river and the ferry. The tall oar-shaped pieces resemble the cross bars of the Story Bridge and reference the history of the row boat which was the main form of transport in the early settlement of Brisbane.


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.21 km ( 0.13 miles )

Venus Rising

Venus Rising

Venus Rising by UK artist Wolfgang Buttress was selected from an international competition and commissioned following a statewide poll. Inspired by the power and symbolism of the Indigenous Morning Star Poles, the artist named the artwork Venus Rising. Morning Star is the name given to the planet Venus just before sunrise when it is at its brightest.


Distance from previous hotspot: 0.70 km ( 0.44 miles )

Seven Versions of the Sun

Seven Versions of the Sun

Seven Versions of the Sun is a series of seven viewing platforms or arbours along the main promenade adjacent to the Kangaroo Point Cliffs. Each shelter is located to draw attention to the stunning views of the river and the city. The screens that form the canopy of the arbours are electroplated to create a luminous and reflective surface. From Lower River Terrace below, the screens appear a shimmering, warm gold against the blue sky. Underneath the arbours, the shelters exude warmth, casting shadows through the laser-cut sun motifs and create an interesting interplay of light and shadow over the landscape. Daniel Boyd explains why he was inspired by the universal and timeless theme of the sun: “The driving component of Seven Versions of the Sun is people moving through the landscape, connected by a common motif, the sun. People and their journeys overlap...


Distance from previous hotspot: 1.24 km ( 0.77 miles )

Wormholes

Wormholes

Wormholes is a compilation of fun, boldly striped, wormlike fantasy creatures that feature a soundscape of people and events from years gone by. Alexander Knox worked with musician Michael Munson to create sounds drawn from the history of the site – the voice of an Indigenous narrator, the squeals of children playing in the former Kangaroo Point Primary School, birds, frogs, ships’ whistles and church bells. Knox explains that Wormholes is intended as an interactive piece: “…where children (and adults) can discover the site and its histories through a combination of free form, exploratory play and exploration without overly prescribing particular activities or readings. The work’s vaguely zoomorphic forms suggest any number of fantasy creatures and scenarios whilst remaining formally abstract”.


Distance from previous hotspot: 1.10 km ( 0.69 miles )

The Green Room and Afforest

The Green Room and Afforest

The Green Room is a soft amphitheatre, a genre of art often referred to as ‘land or earth’ art. Nicole Voevodin-Cash explains that it is a direct reference to the theatre where the city is the stage: “A theatre of the everyday puts on a spectacular show at night as the lights of the cityscape come on to take centre stage”. Afforest (pictured left) is the result of extensive research on traditional gardening techniques of espalier and pleaching. Described as a living artwork, Afforest is a series of grafted and shaped flame trees that “exaggerates and heightens our relationship with nature, emphasising man’s manipulation and control over nature and our role within the natural environment”


Distance from previous hotspot: 1.11 km ( 0.69 miles )













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